Meeting at the makerspace with fashion tech designer Anouk Wipprecht

(originally posted on Digicult – versione italiana sotto)

In “The Diamond Age, A Young Lady’s Illustrated Primer”, a cyberpunk novel by Neal Stephenson, where a near-future world is revolutionised by nanotechnology, Constable – the protagonist’s adoptive father – asks her daughter Nell which path she wants to take: “conformity or rebellion?”. Nell’s goes: “Neither one. Both ways are simple-minded — they are only for people who cannot cope with contradiction and ambiguity.”

Somehow the path Anouk Wipprecht took in her life had to deal with some of the challenges which reminded me of Nell and, like her, she didn’t allow creativity to be sacrificed for conformity. Back in September I spent with Anouk a day wandering from location to location here in Milan, in order to meet all the appointments of her schedule and then perform at Meet the Media Guru, a series of events featuring international leaders in digital culture discussing a variety of topics from science to fashion and environment.

Her work as a fashion tech designer brings her all over the world, especially in the US, where a diverse range of companies like Intel, Samsung and Swarovski commissioned her installations and products mixing the futuristic aesthetics of digital fabrication design, with the most innovative components of wearable tech. Since she started working in this field 12 years ago, she’s been developing 37 projects mainly transforming dresses into interfaces: through the use of robotics and open hardware finally fashion starts talking to us.

During our conversation and her keynotes, it’s clear how for Anouk Wipprecht that fashion means mainly dealing with expressiveness and communication. Born in the Netherlands she studied fashion since age 14 even if her family, not having a wealthy background, would have preferred she’d chosen something more oriented to a “real job”, like being a lawyer or a doctor. In those days Anouk was into drawing and the act of sketching garments became a way to express herself and overcome her introvert attitude. Continue reading Meeting at the makerspace with fashion tech designer Anouk Wipprecht

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Corso di Wearable ed eTextile a Milano!

Dal 9 al 24 Ottobre insieme a Giorgia Petri, tengo la prima edizione del corso di 90 ore sul tema di Wearable ed eTextiles. Il nostro è uno dei vari corsi nella sezione Digital Design & Making curati da WeMake all’interno della Fastweb Digital Academy a Cariplo Factory.

Il corso è gratuito perchè supportato da Fastweb e Fondazione Cariplo, ma è a numero chiuso: le candidature sono aperte in questa pagina.
Continue reading Corso di Wearable ed eTextile a Milano!

Textile Academy bootcamp in Barcelona

Fabricademy is a new textile academy  functioning on the same principles and infrastructure of the global Fab Lab network, but focused on new alternative materials, processes and techniques related to textiles, wearables and soft fabrication. The class will be launched in September 2017, with a top level faculty and an extensive program of 13 weeks, followed by two months of individual project development. Many labs around the world have already expressed interest in participating to this program and it will be opening soon students applications. The course is planned to be carried out all over the world with local and remote sessions. Continue reading Textile Academy bootcamp in Barcelona

Open Lecture at CIID

Last February I visited Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design and gave an Open Lecture on Soft Circuits, DIY and empowerment. 

 

Seoungsu Social Fashion Project in Seoul

In collaboration with Seongdong-gu, the Seoul (Korea) metropolitan government supported Seongsu Social Fashion Project (SSFP) within a bigger  effort to create a Social Economy Fashion Cluster as the center of social fashion as cooperation as a model of local development. The government has the plan of organising the manufacturing site and the production process involving small manufactures in Seongsu-don and to build a network of various business partners, like designers and producers, and professionals. The objective is to create a new, hybrid-style fashion ecosystem in order to develop both social and economic values.

Serpica Naro and WeMake were invited at the end of November 2016 to give a lecture and set up and exhibition to showcase the ongoing experimentation happening in Milan since 2005. We talked about open source fashion, technology,  openwear, social impact and projects taking place at WeMake Fablab and at Serpica Naro Lab.

 

Here you can download the final PDF booklet of the SSFP project.

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